Author: Giselle Patton

BioLite Improved Stove Programme, Uganda

Uganda East African Plateu

Cook stoves reduce emissions in Ugandan households

The BioLite Improved Stove Programme distributes approximately 2,500 domestic fuel-efficient cook stoves to Ugandan households. A BioLite HomeStove is an ultra-clean burning fan-assisted wood stove that cuts toxic pollutant emissions by 90% for a cleaner planet and a healthier household, and reduces fuel use by 50%. In addition, utilizing BioLite’s patented Direct Conduction Thermoelectric System (DCTS), the HomeStove also generates its own electricity, providing users with enough reliable, on-demand electricity in a day’s cooking to fully charge a mobile phone and provide an evening’s worth of bright, LED light.  

HomeStoves are delivered to households.

HomeStoves are delivered to households. Photo courtesy of www.bioliteenergy.com.

Reduced Deforestation 

According to the United Nations, Uganda lost 26 percent of its forest cover between 1990 – 2005, and is still seeing a deforestation rate of over 2 percent each year. A typical Ugandan family uses wood or charcoal as their primary fuels for cooking. Because these new stoves rely on biomass and not wood, surrounding forests are being significantly less affected, protecting ecosystems and local wildlife habitats. The introduction and widespread adoptions of these HomeStoves will further reduce deforestation for fuel consumption, therefore decreasing erosion and nutrient loss. The protection of standing forests will ensure the maintenance of watersheds that regulate water table levels and prevent flash flooding. 

Health Benefits 

Traditional wood and charcoal burning stoves emit an extensive amount of harmful toxins. By introducing biomass stoves, there are less indoor air pollutants, such as carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. Safety in the home is improved, with fewer injuries, burns and respiratory diseases. While cooking, the HomeStove also generates its own electricity, providing users with the ability to charge a phone, or provide light.

Economic Benefits 

The presence of the HomeStove increases the standard of living for each household, as families can spend less time cooking and searching for firewood, and more time pursuing opportunities for economic development. The importation, sale, distribution, maintenance and monitoring of the HomeStoves also create employment opportunities throughout Uganda. The increased thermal efficiency of the cookstoves provide an economic benefit to rural Uganda, allowing households to spend more money on essentials, such as food, healthcare, and education.

 

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BioLite Improved Stove Programme, India

Cook stoves reduce emissions in Indian households

This project involves the distribution of approximately 2,300 domestic fuel-efficient cook stoves to households throughout India. These cooking stoves, which are developed by BioLite and are distributed and installed in collaboration with CO2Balance, are ultra-clean, fan-assisted wood stoves that cut toxic pollutant emissions by 90 percent, and reduce fuel use by 50 percent. In addition to utilizing BioLite’s patented technology (Direct Conduction Thermoelectric System), the HomeStove also generates its own electricity, providing users with enough reliable, on-demand electricity in a day’s cooking to charge a mobile phone and provide an evening’s worth of LED light.

The HomeStove is sold to individual households in exchange for the rights to the Voluntary Emission Reductions (VERs). Most local families would not otherwise have access to these fuel-efficient cook stoves because of its prohibitive expense.

Family using HomeStove

Family using HomeStove. Photo courtesy of BioLite Stove at Flicker.com

Health Benefits

170 million Indian households cook their meals on smoky, open wood fires. These fires contribute to the growing levels of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere. In addition, recent studies have determined that open fire cooking creates more black carbon – the second biggest contributor to global warming – than all the world’s cars and trucks combined. Traditional cook stoves also contribute to significant health and economic costs for users in India. The World Health Organization estimates that over four million people die annually from diseases related to indoor air pollution – more than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. In India alone, roughly 875,000 die as a result of indoor air pollution each year. The introduction and widespread adoption of these clean burning stoves will help prevent unnecessary illness and loss of life to this impoverished area of the country.

 

Economic & Environmental Benefits

Most biomass-burning households in India lack reliable access to electricity; 90 million of them have no electricity at all. This forces these families to use dirty, expensive kerosene lamps for lighting. Purchasing fuel for these lamps can account for between 5 and 30 percent of a family’s income, which costs India’s lower class an estimated $2.2 billion every year. Additionally, wood and solid biomass fuels also impose considerable economic cost to families, either in productive hours lost collecting or in the money required for purchasing the fuel. 

BioLite hires local residents to manage on-the-ground operations, including importing the stoves and managing distribution relationships creating new employment opportunities in the region. Wood and solid biomass fuels also impose considerable economic cost to families, either in productive hours lost collecting or in the money required for purchasing the fuel.

Furthermore, preventing local deforestation for fuel usage will ensure the maintenance of regional watersheds that regulate water table levels and prevent flash flooding. Decreasing firewood consumption protects local ecosystems and wildlife habitats and prevents deforestation, which can reduce erosion and nutrient loss. The updated cookware ensures a healthier household and much cleaner planet.

 

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Prairie Winds ND1 Emissions Reduction Project

Prairie Winds, North Dakota

Prairie Winds aids in the transition toward decarbonized economy in North Dakota

In 2009, the year of its commissioning, Prairie Winds Emissions Reduction Project was the biggest undertaking by an electric power cooperative in the United States.  Owned and operated by Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Prairie Winds is located near Minot, North Dakota, roughly two hours north of Bismarck. The project consists of 77 1.5 megawatt turbines and delivers power into the Western Area Power Administration’s (WAPA) Upper Great Plains East. Emissions reductions are generated by displacing grid connected electricity from traditional fossil fuel electricity sources, reducing our reliance on higher carbon intensive fuels such as coal and natural gas.

With an annual generation of 300,000 MWh of clean energy, Prairie Winds aids in the transition toward a decarbonized economy, and provides greater access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and efficient energy solutions. More low-carbon technologies, such as renewable energy projects like this one, further climate change mitigation.

In addition to the environmental benefits, the project resulted in new job creation during the construction phase and permanent jobs since becoming a working operation. Investments in renewable energy promote resilient infrastructure, inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation.

 

Prairie Winds near Minot, North Dakota

An aerial view of PrairieWinds near Minot, ND. Courtesy of www.basinelectric.com

 

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Larimer County Landfill Gas Project

Larimer County Landfill Gas Project

The Larimer County Landfill is located roughly a mile south of Fort Collins, Colorado. This facility began collecting municipal solid waste in 1986. The cities within Larimer County already had an active recycling program that separates paper, glass and metals, but in September 2009, to address the landfill’s methane emissions, an active gas collection system with 41 wells was voluntarily installed. This system collects the gas and pipes it to the landfill gas processing facility, where a blower sends the gas through a condensate pump and on to an open flare.

Image Open gas flare at the Larimer County Landfill in Fort Collins, CO

Open gas flare at the Larimer County Landfill. Fort Collins, CO

Environmental Benefits

The emission reductions occur when the methane in the landfill gas is destroyed in the flare and is converted to carbon dioxide, which has a much lower global warming potential than methane. The landfill gas collection and combustion system generates annual emission reductions on the order of 20,000 metric tonnes of carbon dioxide-equivalent.

Health Benefits

Roughly 3,000 people live within a 2-mile radius of Larimer County Landfill and benefit from improved air conditions as a result of the project. In addition to methane and carbon dioxide, landfill gas contains numerous other volatile compounds (VOCs), some of which are listed as hazardous air pollutants that pose threats to human health, such as respiratory irritation, central nervous system damage and cancer. The combustion of landfill gas destroys many of these hazardous air pollutants.

Economic Benefits

In 2010, a 1.6 megawatt electric generator was installed to use the captured gas to generate renewable power on site. The power is sold to the Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association, and the utility uses the landfill’s generated electricity to service its customers. Any excess collected gas is combusted in the open flare. 

The innovation of this county landfill project has ensured that the local communities enjoy a reliable power source for years to come without the negative impacts of harmful environmental toxins.

 

 

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Krong Pa Solar Farm

Gia Lai Province Vietnam

Krong Pa Solar Farm brings renewable energy and local benefits in Vietnam

Located in the Gia Lai province of Vietnam, the Krong Pa Solar Farm is one of the first large-scale grid-connected solar farms developed under the nation’s new solar feed-in-tariff policy. The project was commissioned in December 2018, and developed by Gia Lai Electricity Company (GEC), a local renewable energy company with numerous projects in Vietnam. This project is connected to the 110KV national transmission network and contains 209,100 330Wp panels.

Nestled in Vietnam’s Central Highlands, Krong Pa Solar Farm was developed in alignment with local and international standards. No permanent households were relocated for the project. In addition to generating over 100 GWh of solar energy per year and reducing carbon emissions by approximately 80,000 tCO2e annually, the solar farm has numerous co-benefits:

+ Local residents were employed for the construction, maintenance, and continued operation of the project.

+ The project owner is providing support to the local community, including:

+ Local housing opportunities

+ Renovating a local kindergarten

+ Constructing and improving local access roads

+ Installing a water supply pipe for Kien Xuong village

Krong Pa Solar Farm in the Gia Lai province of Vietnam

Krong Pa Solar Farm in the Gia Lai province of Vietnam

3Degrees + Renewable Energy
Certificates

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